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Thursday, July 28, 2016


World’s Most Expensive Smartphone Solarin


15 things you should know about a smartphone
Called Solarin, the cell phone is known as the 'Moves Royce of cell phones'. Israeli startup Sirin Labs has dispatched the world's most costly cell phone. Here are 15 things you have to think about the Android telephone evaluated at $17,000 (Rs 11.3 lakhs roughly).

1. 'Most secured' Android telephone
The highest point of-the-extent telephone guarantees military-grade encryption innovation to ensure clients' calls and messages and is pointed solidly at business pioneers, famous people, VIPs and the super-rich.

The cell phone offers 256-piece AES encryption, verging on like what the resistance strengths use to secure correspondence. The cell phone can be enacted by means of a physical security switch situated at the back of the telephone.


2. Up to ten times quicker
It has, organization authorities guarantee, the best screen, the best sunshine advanced mobile phone camera, the wealthiest and loudest speakers, more 4G LTE groups than whatever other telephone ever, and WiFi speeds up to ten times speedier than today's systems.

Need to download a full HD motion picture in only five seconds? Sirin Labs guarantees that as well.

The one hitch is the sticker price.

Got an extra $17,000? The essential model is an eye-watering £9,500 in addition to VAT, or $16,560 including U.S. charges.

3. Protection bundle
At the point when the security switch is enacted, the telephone enters a shield mode for completely scrambled calls and messages.

So what does Solarin offer for your wads of dollars?

There's a "deliberately curated security bundle," with Zimperium cutting edge portable danger insurance and KoolSpan military-grade chip-to-chip 256-piece AES encryption, which they say offers the "most grounded conceivable versatile protection assurance around the world."

4.First Global advanced mobile phone with WiGig innovation
It's all around upgraded, which means Solarin "interfaces with the rate of a nearby handset anyplace on the planet," says Fredrik Oijer, Sirin Labs' VP of item.

Organization authorities say it's likewise the main worldwide advanced cell with WiGig innovation, offering rates of up to 4.6Gbps, empowering close moment cloud access, and syncing of photographs, recordings and media.

5. Focus for programmers
"This is something that can happen to any of us," says Cohen. "It's only an issue of in case you're focused on or not."

The wealthy and powerful clients Sirin Labs would like to draw in — superstars, VIPs and business pioneers — are especially helpless against this sort of assault.

"A standout amongst the most critical things that we learnt amid the most recent quite a long while is that physical security needs to run with digital security," says Sirin Labs consultative board part Rami Efrati, author and president of Israeli digital security firm Firmitas.

6. Keeps running on Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 processor
Solarin keeps running on 2GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 processor, accompanies support for 24 groups of LTE, and guarantees "far prevalent" Wi-Fi network than standard cellular telephones.

7. Has a 23.8MP camera
It highlights a 23.8-megapixel camera, with laser self-adjust and four-tone streak. There's a 8-megapixel front camera with glimmer and electrical picture adjustment.

8. Plan and Weight

With respect to plan, it appears they've deliberately maintained a strategic distance from the pompous bling you may anticipate from a telephone in this value range.

The downplayed titanium and calfskin configuration is by commended modern planner Karim Rashid, who's worked with Giorgio Armani, Alessi and Veuve Cliquot.

Solarin is without a doubt not a smooth cell phone, it weighs as much as 250gm. It quantifies 78mm wide x 159.8mm x 11.1mm.

9. Presentation and OS

Solarin has a 5.5-inch Gorilla Glass 4-ensured IPS screen with LED 2K determination. The cell phone keeps running on intensely cleaned Android 5.1 working framework.

10. Sound

The sound framework sound uses three bass-supported speakers, connected through a shrewd enhancer to amplify volume however control mutilation, and can go up to 90 decibels.

11. Non-expandable capacity

Solarin packs a 4,000mAh battery and has 4GB of RAM and 128GB of non-expandable stockpiling. The organization claims talk-time of 31 hours (UMTS) and standby time of 'more than 2 weeks' for the cell phone. It likewise accompanies Qualcomm QuickCharge 2.0 backing.

12. Shading alternatives

The cell phone comes in four shading alternatives: Fire Black Carbon Leather with Titanium, Fire Black Carbon Leather with Diamond-like Carbon, Fire Black Carbon Leather with Yellow Gold and Crystal White Carbon Leather with Diamond-like Carbon.

13. Is water and clean safe

Solarin is water/dust safe up to IP54 level.

14. 'No 100 percent secure arrangement'

Be that as it may, is it conceivable to make a PDA that is safe to assault? What's more, by announcing yourself the world's most secure advanced mobile phone, aren't you setting a test to each programmer on the planet?

"We're not saying it's unhackable," says Avraham. "Be that as it may, in any event we will identify it.

"We'll have the capacity to figure out the assaults, see what they attempted to do. Indeed, even clean the telephone without the client doing anything.

"There is all day, every day occurrence reaction at both Zimperium and Sirin that screens these gadgets.

"There is no 100 percent secure arrangement, however the other option is to get hacked and not think about it."

15. Accessibility

Solarin cell phone is accessible all alone leader store in London's Mayfair neighborhood; and will go marked down at Harrods from on June 30. The organization likewise plans to open extra retail locations crosswise over Europe, North America, and Asia later in the year

Tuesday, June 7, 2016

Some big websites might require you to change passwords

 
If you receive an email from Netflix or Facebook asking you to change your password because it matches a credential from an older security breach, you may want to heed its advice. Cyber-security expert Brian Krebs says some big companies, including the streaming service and the social network, tend to go through data from other websites' security breaches to look for log-ins that match their users'. They then force those users to change the passwords they reused to keep them safe. If you'll recall, hackers recently sold the millions of log-in combinations they stole from LinkedIn, Tumblr and MySpace a few years ago.
According to Krebs, Netflix has already begun sending out password resets after scouring the log-in credentials leaked online. The company apparently uses a tool it released in 2014 to comb through leaked log-ins -- so, yes, the email is legit and not an attempt to phish for your details. Of course, the best way to ensure you're safe is to use a unique password for every online account and to delete anything you don't use anymore.

Monday, May 23, 2016

India successfully tests first tiny reusable space shuttle

India's space agency is celebrating today after successfully launching and recovering RLV-TD, a prototype reusable space vehicle. The craft was launched at 9:00am local time and rose 43 miles into the air before gliding back down, making a safe landing in the Bay of Bengal. As promising as it sounds, the test craft won't be offering any passenger launches just yet, since it was a seven meter long scale model. Still, now that India has demonstrable proof that its shuttle design works, it could set its sights towards becoming a space power like the US, Russia and China.
A seven meter scale model of a shuttle may sound a little silly when Elon Musk's flinging full-size rockets into the sky, but there's logic here. India's space agency is famously frugal, with the five-year reusable shuttle project believed to cost as little as $14 million. It's not the first time the country has shown up its rivals with its low-budget smarts, either, having put a satellite around Mars in 2014 for just $72 million. By comparison, the budget for the film Gravity was closer to $100 million -- so a real Indian space mission cost less than a fake American one.

India's space agency is celebrating today after successfully launching and recovering RLV-TD, a prototype reusable space vehicle. The craft was launched at 9:00am local time and rose 43 miles into the air before gliding back down, making a safe landing in the Bay of Bengal. As promising as it sounds, the test craft won't be offering any passenger launches just yet, since it was a seven meter long scale model. Still, now that India has demonstrable proof that its shuttle design works, it could set its sights towards becoming a space power like the US, Russia and China.
A seven meter scale model of a shuttle may sound a little silly when Elon Musk's flinging full-size rockets into the sky, but there's logic here. India's space agency is famously frugal, with the five-year reusable shuttle project believed to cost as little as $14 million. It's not the first time the country has shown up its rivals with its low-budget smarts, either, having put a satellite around Mars in 2014 for just $72 million. By comparison, the budget for the film Gravity was closer to $100 million -- so a real Indian space mission cost less than a fake American one.
Via: engagdet.com

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

LINKING SIMPLE CHEMISTRY TO SOMETHING LIKE LIFE.



A computer model of a growing membrane.
 

Origin of life researchers have made impressive progress in recent years, showing that simple chemicals can combine to make nucleotides, the building blocks of DNA and RNA. Given the right conditions, these nucleotides can combine into ever-longer stretches of RNA. A lot of work has demonstrated that RNAs can perform all sorts of interesting chemistry, specifically binding other molecules and catalyzing reactions.
So the case for life getting its start in an RNA world has gotten very strong in the past decade, but the difference between a collection of interesting RNAs and anything like a primitive cell—surrounded by membranes, filled with both RNA and proteins, and running a simple metabolism—remains a very wide chasm. Or so it seems. A set of papers that came out in the past several days suggest that the chasm might not be as large as we'd tend to think.

Ironing out metabolism

A lot of the basic chemistry that drives the cell is based on electron transport, typically involving proteins that contain an iron atom. These reactions not only create some of the basic chemicals that are necessary for life, they're also essential to powering the cell. Both photosynthesis and the breakdown of sugars involve the transfer of electrons to and from proteins that contain an iron atom.
DNA and RNA tend to have nothing to do with iron, interacting with magnesium instead. But some researchers at Georgia Tech have considered that fact a historical accident. Since photosynthesis put so much oxygen into the atmosphere, most of the iron has been oxidized into a state where it's not soluble in water. If you go back to before photosynthesis was around, the oceans were filled with dissolved iron. Previously, the group had shown that, in oxygen-free and iron rich conditions, RNAs would happily work with iron instead and that its presence could speed up their catalytic activity.
Now the group is back with a new paper showing that if you put a bunch of random RNAs into the same conditions, some of them can catalyze electron transfer reactions. By "random," I mean RNAs that are currently used by cells to do completely unrelated things (specifically, ribosomal and transfer RNAs). The reactions they catalyze are very simple, but remember: these RNAs don't normally function as a catalyst at all. It wouldn't surprise me if, after a number of rounds of evolutionary selection, an iron-RNA combination could be found that catalyzes a reaction that's a lot closer to modern metabolism.
All of which suggests that the basics of a metabolism could have gotten started without proteins around.

Proteins build membranes

Clearly, proteins showed up at some point. They certainly didn't look much like the proteins we see today, which may have hundreds or thousands of amino acids linked together. In fact, they may not have looked much like proteins at all, if a paper from Jack Szostak's group is any indication. Szostak's found that just two amino acids linked together may have catalytic activity. Some of that activity can help them engage in competition over another key element of the first cells: membrane material.
The work starts with a two amino acid long chemical called a peptide. If that peptide happens to be serine linked to histidine (two amino acids in use by life today), it has an interesting chemical activity: very slowly and poorly, it links other amino acids together to form more peptides. This weak activity is especially true if the amino acids are phenylalanine and leucine, two water-hating chemicals. Once they're linked, they will precipitate out of a water solution.
The authors added a fatty acid membrane, figuring that it would soak up the reaction product. That definitely worked, with the catalytic efficiency of serine-histidine going up as a result. But something else happened as well: membranes that incorporated the reaction product started growing. It turns out that its presence in the membrane made it an efficient scrounger of other membrane material. As they grew, these membranes extended as long filaments that would break up into smaller parts with a gentle agitation and then start growing all over again.
In fact, the authors could set up a bit of a Darwinian competition between membranes based on how much starting catalyst each had. All of which suggests that proteins might have found their way into the cell as very simple chemicals that, at least initially, weren't in any way connected to genetic and biochemical functions performed by RNA. But any cell-like things that evolved an RNA that made short proteins could have a big advantage over its competition.

Proteins go big

How do you go from short peptides to long, complex proteins that rely on a specific sequence of amino acids in order to function? It turns out that you need a fairly specific sequence in order to perform an equally specific function (although even that can be very flexible). However, you may not need to be very specific at all if you just care about having any function at all. In other words, it may have been useful for a cell to just randomly link amino acids together.
This work grew out of a previous study in which someone specified enough of the amino acid sequence to allow a protein to fold up into a small spherical structure. Anything beyond that was made random. The surprising thing was that these partly random sequences ended up doing all sorts of different things, binding some chemicals, catalyzing reactions, and so forth. But it's hard to make and test a huge complement of random sequences, so the authors turned to computational modeling, trying out a comprehensive set of potential proteins.
It turns out that a lot of them would potentially stick to interesting chemicals and form various binding pockets. In fact, a number of proteins that appear to be entirely unrelated on the sequence level happily formed very similarly shaped binding pockets. All of which suggests that making just any protein, with little regard for its actual sequence, could have a positive impact on the cell's fitness. Once in place, it could be adapted to be a bit more sequence-specific.
Although all of these results are exciting, it's important to place them in context. We're never going to know precisely how life first arose, since the actual evidence for the events no longer exists. But we can come up with plausible pathways from basic chemistry to simple biochemistry, something these studies seem to provide. That's not to say that another study won't come up with something that's even more plausible in the future.
The other thing to note is that these studies may start filling in what seems to be a big chasm between life and non-life, and they have a habit of taking a single gap and dividing it in two. They may identify landmarks on the journey towards life, but they open up new questions about exactly what route was taken between them.

Friday, February 22, 2013

Microsoft Kinect Hacked to play World of Warcraft

Living Rooms all around the world are shaking with fear of users actually taking swords and attacking their big screens thanks to a new hack for the Microsoft Kinect that allows gamers to play World of Warcraft without a keyboard.



It’s no secret that the Kinect is rapidly becoming the most hacked device since the Hackintosh, but students at the University of Southern California’s Institute for Creative Technologies have takent he next step in developing a software hack which enables gamers to use the motion device to immerse themselves even deeper into the online Mid-evil world.
The hack is called the “Flexible Action and Articulated Skeleton Toolkit, (FAAST) and it uses full-body motion control. Gamer can not only wield a sword or axe to take out a feisty orc, but they can also cast spells, making it nirvana for those who secretly love to dress up to play their favorite game. And it’s only a matter of time before someone figures out a way to use their light saber collection to battle someone online.
But with everyone creating bold new uses for the Kinect and porting it over to the PC, the sky is truly the limit for what can be done with this game changing device. And it makes the world of Minority Report that much closer, but in a bold and exciting way. Imagine editing video’s just with a snip of your fingers and a wave of your hand? Designing in CAD programs Tony Stark style. And getting rid of the keyboard forever?
It’s not just for games anymore and that’s a cool thing.

Friday, January 11, 2013

Remotely Send Web Pages to your mobile phones.


Remote URL
Framote is new tool that helps you share “live” URLs that can be controlled remotely.
To get started, you can specify any website – say cnn.com – and Framote will create a unique URL for that site. You can share that URL with a group of people and everyone will see the same website on their screens. If you update the underlying website at your end, all the other screens are refreshed automatically.
The service is especially useful for testing responsive designs. You can have the main website on your desktop computer and load the corresponding Framote URLs on your tablets and mobile phones. If you open a different page on your desktop, the mobile screens are updated automatically.
Internally, Framote embeds the source website into an IFRAME and makes an AJAX request to check the actual URL every few seconds. If the source URL has been modified, the IFRAME’s source attribute on the client’s screen is updated almost instantly. The Framote dashboard will also show list of IP address and devices that are accessing your unique URL.